A Wrap-Up From My “Providence” Reading Guide

After twelve issues – or eighteen, if you count The Courtyard and Neonomicon – we come to the end of Alan Moore and Jacen Burrows’ Providence. To finally have the whole project complete at last, we can finally sit back and reflect. No more annotations, no more stressing over page borders and trying to find the one black cat, no […]

via Providence At Last — Facts in the Case of Alan Moore’s Providence

Guest Post: Is Providence Moore’s Riposte To True Detective? — Facts in the Case of Alan Moore’s Providence

By Edward Saul Excitement abounds for we enthusiasts of Alan Moore, HP Lovecraft and Weird Fiction, as the crashing denouement to Providence looms overhead. Considering that the exact release date for Providence #11, let alone #12, is aptly unknowable, now is the prime time for speculation. Such speculation should not, of course, be limited merely […]

via Guest Post: Is Providence Moore’s Riposte To True Detective? — Facts in the Case of Alan Moore’s Providence

The Total Beginner’s Guide to Submitting Short Fiction for Publication

Amanda C. Davis

How to finish and format your stories, find markets that want to read them, and send them out in ways that make you look and feel professional.

One of my writers’ group people recently mentioned she had no idea where to start to find people to publish her short stories and poetry; I’ve been on Duotrope (and surrounded by working writers on Twitter) for so long that I’d forgotten what a hurdle it was figuring out how to go about it. I can’t tell you how to write well enough to sell, but the act of sending out your work shouldn’t be as tough to learn as it was for me. It’s strictly business correspondence. Here’s everything I know.

This guide makes the following assumptions:

A) You’re writing short fiction. (“Short” meaning 0-17,500 words, though this method might work for novellas and poetry too.)

B) You will…

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